Archive for June, 2017

If your child or adolescent develops heel pain, chances are it’s due to Sever disease, which is also known as calcaneal apophysitis. Sever disease is one of the most common sources of heel pain in adolescents and most commonly affects children between the age of 6-13 who are active and involved in sports. Sever is an irritation or inflammation of the heel bone growth plate which is a result of the heel bone growing faster than the surrounding muscles and tendons. Along with repetitive microtrauma, these tight tissues cause increased pull on the growth plate, which results in pain. It is commonly seen in soccer players. Traditionally Sever used to be more common in boys; however, due to the increasing number of girls involved in organized sports, it is becoming more common in the female population.

Sever disease will eventually resolve on its own without any long-term complications. All treatments are symptom based and some children may have to decrease or take off some time from sports until the pain goes away. In some severe cases, children may have to be immobilized in a walking boot for a couple of weeks until the pain subsides. Sever patients commonly have a tight Achilles tendon, so stretching exercises are very important to help try to decrease some of the pull on the growth plate. Anti-inflammatories and ice are also recommended. Return to activity is based on relief of symptoms and should be done gradually. When returning to play, gel heel cups can be used in the cleats or sneakers in order to help provide some cushion.

—Dr. Colleen Law

 

Lateral Ankle Sprains

June 21st, 2017 by Lindsay Lopez

Lateral ankle sprains are the most common type of ankle sprains. These sprains happen after an inversion injury or inward rolling of your foot on your ankle and affect the ligaments on the outside of your ankle. They most commonly occur in sports, especially seen in basketball and football, but also can occur in everyday activity. The lateral ankle is composed of three major ligaments, the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the calcaneal fibular ligament (CFL), and the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL). There are varying degrees of severity of ankle sprains, but the most commonly injured ligament is the ATFL.

Certain people are more prone to ankle sprains than others, especially those with a higher arch foot or those who have had a severe or multiple sprains in the past. It is normal after suffering from a sprain to have varying levels of swelling and bruising. The most important thing following a sprain is over the first 24-72 hours to practice the pneumonic RICE. RICE stands for rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Studies also show that initiation of early range of motion is key in the recovery process. Once the swelling goes down, then strengthening of the muscles around the ankle joint should be initiated to help prevent chronic ankle instability. Taping, bracing, and balancing exercises also can help in preventing re-injury. Most people start to feel better after a sprain over a couple of days, but in the case of severe sprains this could take several weeks to recover. If you develop a sprain that is not improving over a couple days, especially if you have followed the pneumonic RICE, then make sure you schedule an appointment with your doctor.

 

-Dr. Colleen Law

If you begin to develop a nagging pain without significant change in your mileage or training, you must consider your shoe gear. Running shoes typically are good for about 300-500 miles depending on running surfaces, experience, and size of the runner. These first few signs of a nagging pain is usually a way of your body telling you that you need a new pair of sneakers.
Another important way to prevent injuries when it comes to running shoes is to find a type of shoe that is most compatible with your foot structure. Everyone’s feet are different so a type of shoe that works well for your friend, may not work as well for you. People who have a flatter arch and overpronate need more of a motion controlled stability type shoe, whereas those who have a high arch and underpronate do better with more cushioned and neutral type shoe. Especially if you are new runner, I would recommend going to your local running store to help you find a pair of sneakers. These stores typically have experienced runners who will evaluate your foot type as well as running goals to help find you a shoe that would work the best for you. Once getting your new sneakers, make sure you take a couple of days walking around in them prior to running in order to help break them in. Also, another good tip is to buy two pairs at once and alternate running in them every other day in order to slow down the wear of an individual pair.

-Dr. Colleen Law

 

Dr. Colleen Law’s Introduction Post

June 6th, 2017 by Mallory Snow

I am very excited to be joining Dr. Murray, Dr. Chang, Dr. Baglio, and Dr. Schustek and the rest of the team at Blue Ridge Foot and Ankle Clinic in July! I graduated from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and completed my residency at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Allentown, Pennsylvania. While at St. Luke’s, I had experience training in both the inpatient and outpatient setting, as well surgical training in elective and non-elective foot and ankle surgery, and experience with wound care and diabetic limb salvage.

I am interested in treating a variety of different pathologies in the foot and ankle, but one area that I am particularly interested in is sports medicine. In college, I competed on the cross country and track teams at Lehigh University. After suffering from a foot injury, which required surgery during my freshman year, I was introduced to the field of podiatry. I really like that I can relate my love for running with my job as a podiatrist and understand what it is like recovering from an injury and returning to activity.

In my free time I like to spend time with my husband Matt and viszla, Zoey. We enjoy running and other outdoor activities and look forward to getting involved with the Charlottesville community.

I am really excited about the move to the Charlottesville area and am eager to start meeting and working with patients in July!

-Dr. Colleen Law

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