Posts Tagged ‘foot surgery’

Colleen Law graduated from Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and completed her residency at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Allentown, Pennsylvania. At St. Luke’s, she underwent extensive training in elective and reconstructive forefoot, rearfoot, and ankle surgery, as well as experience in wound care and diabetic limb salvage.

Prior to her medical education, Dr. Law attended Lehigh University, where she was a member of the cross country and track and field teams. Through this experience, she developed an interest in sports medicine, which led her to pursue a career in podiatry. In addition to her interest in sports medicine, she is also interested in elective and reconstructive foot and ankle surgery and diabetic limb salvage.

During her free time, Dr. Law enjoys spending time running and hiking with her husband Matt and vizsla.

Dr. Law is accepting new patients beginning July 17, 2017.

cycle

Common cycling injuries are often due to trying to do, “too much, too soon”, but may also be due to improper equipment, biomechanics, technique, or bike fit.  As with all athletic injuries, pain that is persistent indicates a need to seek treatment from a sports medicine specialist familiar with cycling injuries.

Foot Pain

1. “Hot foot” (numbness and burning in the ball of the foot)

Impingement of small nerve branches between the second and third or third and fourth toes can cause swelling which results in numbness, tingling, or burning, or sharp shooting pains into the toes.  Loosening shoe toe straps, wearing wider shoes with a stiffer sole and using anatomical footbed with a metarsal pad will help alleviate the problem.

Besides tight shoes, another risk factor is small pedals, especially if you have large feet.  Small pedal surfaces concentrate pressure on the ball of the foot.  Switching to larger pedals may be the cure.  Re-focus the pressure on the ball of the foot by moving the cleats towards the rear of the shoe.  If your cycling shoes have flexible soles like most mountain bike shoes, they’ll be less able to diffuse pressure.

Physician-designed custom orthotics provide biomechanical benefits and can be made with built-in “neuroma pads”.  Cycling orthotics are different than those for runners, as cycling is a forefoot activity, not a heel-strike activity.mt climb

Cortisone injections occasionally may be helpful for symptomatic relief, but they do not address the cause of the pain.

2. Sesamoiditis:

The sesamoids are two small “seed-like” bones found beneath the big toe joint.  Injury to these tiny bones can result in inflammation or even fracture, leading to debilitating pain and inactivity. Sesamoiditis can be relieved with proper shoe selection, accommodative padding, and foot orthoses.

Leg Pain

1. Achilles tendonitis

Irritation and inflammation of the tendon that attaches to the back of the heel done can be caused by improper pedaling, seat height, lack of a proper warm-up, or overtraining.  This condition is usually seen in more experienced riders and can be treated with ice, rest, aspirin, or other anti-inflammatory medications.  Chronic pain or any swelling should be professionally evaluated.  Floating pedals which allow excessive foot pronation may also worsen this condition.

2. Shin splints

Pain to either side of the leg bone, caused by muscle or tendon inflammation, which may be related to a muscle imbalance between opposing muscle groups in the leg.  It is commonly related to excessive foot pronation (collapsing arch).  Proper stretching, changing pedals, and corrective orthoses that limit pronation can help.

Knee Pain

Some intrinsic knee problems like swelling, clicking, or popping should be immediately evaluated by a sports medicine specialist.  Cartilage irritation or deterioration, usually under the knee-cap, can be caused by biomechanical imbalance, improper saddle height, or faulty foot positioning on the pedals.  Riding in too high a gear “mashing”, excessive uphill climbing, or standing on the pedals all may aggravate the problem.  Cleated shoes or touring shoes with ribbed soles that limit side-to-side motion can cause knee pain if the knees, feet, and pedals are misaligned.

1. Chondromalacia

Pain under the kneecap.  Most chondromalacia sufferers can ride at some level no matter how sever the degeneration.

2. Patellar Tendonitis

Strain of the tendon which attaches the kneecap to the leg, this injury often occurs in the novice cyclist or early in the cycling season.  The first sign of a problem may be an ominous twinge after cycling in too hard a gear.mark_1

Cycling tips

Bike fit is key; have a professional check your fit and make bike modifications as needed.

Carefully choose the shoes you will wear in cycling.

Train properly using adequate warm-up and cool-down. If you are doing “too much, too soon” and start having pain, reduce training frequency, intensity, and time.

Pain is not normal and may indicate a medical condition. Seek medical attention from a sports medicine specialist.

Before beginning any exercise program, be sure to check with your physician.

-The American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine (AAPSM)

 

Comment on this post to share your thoughts or contact Blue Ridge Foot and Ankle Clinic. We’d love to hear from you!

Blue Ridge Foot and Ankle Clinic
Charlottesville Podiatrist Location: 887 A Rio E Ct., Charlottesville VA, 22911 (434) 979-8116
Waynesboro Podiatrist Location: 417 S. Magnolia Waynesboro, VA 22980 540-949-5150

Blue Ridge Foot and Ankle Clinic has been a part of the Waynesboro and Charlottesville communities for over 20 years.  Podiatrists Dr. Kevin Murray and Dr. Stewart Chang offer services in sports podiatry, foot and ankle problems and diabetic foot care. Our friendly, accommodating team of Certified Podiatric Medical Assistants look forward to welcoming
you to our practice.

Summer Blog Series: Acute Inflammation

July 31st, 2012 by Dr.Chang

Inflammation is your body’s response to injuries, trauma, illness or infections, in which your body tries to increase the blood flow to the affected area. The accumulation of fluids, however, can be painful and result in swelling, increased warmth and redness of the skin, and even bruising. Acute inflammation is the immediate response to trauma, injury, irritation or surgery, and will usually occur within two hours of the event of injury. Note that acute inflammation is different from chronic inflammation, which is more regular, does not always follow a traumatic injury, is caused by a virus or bacteria and therefore treated differently.

Acute inflammation treatment should be responded to with “RICE to the D” therapy: the age old Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation, mixed with a Diagnosis from your podiatrist, since your podiatrist can best determine the cause of your foot and ankle pain and swelling. Remember to R: stay off your foot or ankle since pressure on it may cause further injury. I: Apply an ice pack or bag of ice to intervals of 15 minutes to the injured area, placing a thin towel between the ice and your skin. Wait for 40 minutes before icing again. Repeat as desired – the more the better! C: you can control swelling with an elastic wrap around the inflamed area, and E: raise your foot or ankle slightly above the level of your heart to reduce the swelling. Your podiatrist may also suggest that you take NSAIDs. With RICE, your symptoms will most likely improve within a few days. If your symptoms persist or worsen, be sure to see your podiatrist to receive a proper diagnosis and care.

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